Collections

Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Coptic Studies
Coptic Studies
Islamic Studies
Islamic Studies
Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
Ancient Near East
Ancient Near East
Ottoman Egypt
Ottoman Egypt
Arabic Collection
Arabic Collection

ARCE Publications | منشورات مركز البحوث الأمريكي بمصر

Show More
Annual Meeting Abstract Booklets
Annual Meeting Abstract Booklets

Annual Meeting Abstract Booklets
Annual Meeting Abstract Booklets
JARCE
JARCE

JARCE
JARCE
NARCE/BARCE
NARCE/BARCE

NARCE/BARCE
NARCE/BARCE

Research Supporting Members | الأعضاء من الهيئات الداعمة للبحث العلمي

Show More
American University in Cairo
American University in Cairo

American University in Cairo

AUC
AUC
American Archaeology Abroad 
American Archaeology Abroad 

American Archaeology Abroad 

AAA
AAA
The Ancient Egyptian Heritage and Archaeology Fund
The Ancient Egyptian Heritage and Archaeology Fund

The Ancient Egyptian Heritage and Archaeology Fund

AEHAF
AEHAF
Ancient Egypt Research Associates
Ancient Egypt Research Associates

Ancient Egypt Research Associates

AERA
AERA
University of Oxford
University of Oxford

Ashmolean Museum

uo
uo
Brigham Young University
Brigham Young University

Brigham Young University

BYU
BYU
The British Museum
The British Museum

The British Museum

BM
BM
Brooklyn Museum of Art
Brooklyn Museum of Art

Brooklyn Museum of Art

BMA
BMA
Case Western Reserve University
Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University

CWRU
CWRU
DePaul University
DePaul University

DePaul University

DPU
DPU
Harvard University
Harvard University

Harvard University

HU
HU
Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University

Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

LACMA
LACMA
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

MMA
MMA
Michael C. Carlos Museum of Art, Emory University
Michael C. Carlos Museum of Art, Emory University

Michael C. Carlos Museum of Art, Emory University

MCMA
MCMA
New York University
New York University

New York University

NYU
NYU
The University of Chicago
The University of Chicago

The University of Chicago

uch
uch
Pacific Lutheran University
Pacific Lutheran University

Pacific Lutheran University

PLU
PLU
Princeton University
Princeton University

Princeton University

PU
PU
Roanoke College
Roanoke College

Roanoke College

RC
RC
University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas

University of Arkansas

UA
UA
University of California, Los Angeles
University of California, Los Angeles

University of California, Los Angeles

UCLA
UCLA
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

UPMAA
UPMAA
University of Wisconsin - La Crosse
University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

UWC
UWC
Yale University
Yale University

Yale University

York University
York University

York University

YU
YU
Getty Conservation Institute
Getty Conservation Institute

Getty Conservation Institute

GCI
GCI
College of Charleston
College of Charleston

College of Charleston

COC
COC
University of Michigan
University of Michigan

University of Michigan

UOM
UOM
University of Toronto
University of Toronto

University of Toronto

UOT
UOT
Council of American Overseas Research Centers
Council of American Overseas Research Centers

Council of American Overseas Research Centers

CAORC
CAORC
Brown University
Brown University

Brown University

BU
BU
Center for Middle Eastern Studies for University of Arizona
Center for Middle Eastern Studies for University of Arizona

Center for Middle Eastern Studies for University of Arizona

CMESUA
CMESUA

Electronic Resources | المصادر الإلكترونية

Show More
BRILL
1959
BRILL

no

JSTOR
1962
JSTOR

no

Archaeopress
Archaeopress

Archaeopress

Archaeopress
Archaeopress
EKB
EKB

EKB
EKB
OEB
OEB

OEB
OEB
ARCE conservation Archive
ARCE conservation Archive

ARCE conservation Archive
ARCE conservation Archive

Open Access | المصادر المفتوحة

Show More
Archaeopress
Archaeopress

Archaeopress
Archaeopress
The archaeological survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69 : the Pharaonic sites
2020
The archaeological survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69 : the Pharaonic sites

This volume, focusing on pharaonic sites, brings to publication the records of the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN). These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding and of considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia.

David N. Edwards, Anthony J. Mills, Lauriane Mielle, Vivian Davies
David N. Edwards, Anthony J. Mills, Lauriane Mielle, Vivian Davies
Mapping the past : from sampling sites and landscapes to exploring the 'archaeological continuum' : proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-8 June 2108, Paris, France). $n Volume 8/session VIII-1
2020
Mapping the past : from sampling sites and landscapes to exploring the 'archaeological continuum' : proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-8 June 2108, Paris, France). $n Volume 8/session VIII-1

Session VIII-1 of UISPP 2018 in Paris ?Mapping the Past? brought together several contributions reflecting on the need to develop sustainable and reliable approaches to mapping our landscape heritage. The session was guided by the crucial concept termed the ?archaeological continuum?. This concept can be defined as a proactive approach to landscape survey based on the summative evidence detected (or detectable) within the area under examination, reducing spatial and chronological gaps as far as possible through the intensive and extensive application of a wide variety of exploratory methods and analytical techniques. Research work across Europe as well as contributions presented in this session have demonstrated that it is now possible to explore the whole landscape of carefully chosen areas and study them as an archaeological continuum. Archaeological interpretations derived from this kind of approach can be expected to reveal different layers of information belonging to a variety of chronological horizons, each displaying mutual physical (stratigraphic) and conceptual relationships within that horizon. The raising of new archaeological questions and also the development of alternative conservation strategies directly stimulated by the radical ideas inherent in the concept of the ?archaeological continuum? are among the major outcomes of the session

Why did ancient states collapse? : the dysfunctional state
2019
Why did ancient states collapse? : the dysfunctional state

Ancient states were rooted in agriculture, sedentism and population growth. They were fragile and prone to collapse, but there is no consensus on the causes or meaning of collapse, and there is an ongoing debate about the importance, nature and even existence of state-wide collapse Explanations of collapse in terms of competing mono-causal factors are found inferior to those incorporating dynamic, interactive systems. It is proposed that collapse should be explained as failure to fulfil the ancient state’s core functions: assurance of food supplies, defence against external attack, maintenance of internal peace, imposition of its will throughout its territory, enforcement of state-wide laws, and promotion of an ideology to legitimise the political and social status quo. To fulfil these functions certain necessary conditions must be met. The legitimacy of the political and social status quo, including the distribution of political power and wealth, needs to be accepted; the state should be able to extract sufficient resources to fulfil its functions such as defence; it must be able to enforce its decisions; the ruling elite should share a common purpose and actions; the society needs to reflect a shared spirit (asibaya) and purpose across elites and commoners who believe it is worthy of defence. Weaknesses and failure to meet any condition can interact to exacerbate the situation: maladministration, corruption and elite preoccupation with self aggrandisement can induce fiscal weakness, reduced military budgets and further invasion; it can induce neglect of key infrastructures (especially water management). Inequality, a commonly neglected factor despite ancient texts, can erode asibaya and legitimacy and alienate commoners from defence of the state. These themes are explored in relation to the Egyptian Old Kingdom, Mycenae, the Western Roman Empire (WRE), and the Maya. They all exhibit, to varying degrees, weaknesses in meeting the above conditions necessary for stability. (Some of the explanatory political and social factors involved have modern analogies but that issue is not examined)

Malcolm Levitt
Malcolm Levitt
Ancient Egyptian and Ancient Near Eastern palaces Volume II : Proceedings of a workshop held at the 10th ICAANE in Vienna, 25 -26 April 2016
2019
Ancient Egyptian and Ancient Near Eastern palaces Volume II : Proceedings of a workshop held at the 10th ICAANE in Vienna, 25 -26 April 2016

The study of the semiotics of palaces in the Ancient Near East and Ancient Egypt provides the historian with diverse information as size and type of architecture demonstrate the kind of representation chosen by rulers towards their world. Some features were adopted from temples in order to stage the appearance of the ruler like a divine epiphany. Some further integrate a temple within the palace, showcasing the desire of the ruler to live with a specific deity under one roof for divine support and protection. The importance of this ruler can also be reflected by the size of the throne room and the number of columns, showing as well a hierarchy in the use of space within the whole building complex and its different units. For instance, the presence of a rather intimate throne room or a second small throne room points to space for confidential exchange between the ruler and his visitors. The capacity of storerooms additionally gives us insight into the economic power standing behind the palace. The comparison of different elements between palatial and domestic architecture also proves helpful in identifying the origins of particular components.0Exploration of such semiotics was initiated with the publication of the first palace volume in 2018 (Verlag der ÖAW, Vienna) following a conference held in London 2013. The present volume stands in direct continuation and is the result of a second palace conference that took place at the 10th ICAANE 2016 in Vienna. Besides introducing other palaces in Egypt and Nubia, this volume is dedicated primarily to Near Eastern palaces which are presented and studied by prominent experts in this field

Manfred Bietak, Paolo Matthiae, Silvia Prell
Manfred Bietak, Paolo Matthiae, Silvia Prell
On the origins of the cartouche and encircling symbolism in Old Kingdom pyramids
2020
On the origins of the cartouche and encircling symbolism in Old Kingdom pyramids

This study suggests the development of the cartouche was closely related to the monumental encircling symbolism incorporated into the architectural designs of the Old Kingdom pyramids. By employing a new architectural style and a new iconographic symbol, the pharaoh sought to elevate his status above that of the members of his powerful court.

David Ian Lightbody
David Ian Lightbody

Quick Links | روابط ذات صلة

Show More
ifao
1231-1311
ifao

cealex
cealex

DAI
DAI

ideo
ideo

nvic
nvic

ARCE Library Reopening Guidelines